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Tutorial 1: A hands-on introduction to running large-scale wireless sensor networking experiments
Tutorial 2: Building Reconfigurable Sensing Applications

 

Tutorial 1: A hands-on introduction to running large-scale wireless sensor networking experiments

Prerequisites

Please install a Java Runtime Environment (jre) on your PC. The tutorial is compatible with the Sun java5 jre, but oracle java7 jre is preferred.

Ubuntu:
http://www.ubuntuupdates.org/ppa/webupd8_java

Other OSes:
http://docs.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/webnotes/install/index.html

Relevance of the tutorial for EWSN attendees

For those participants who never employed experimentally-supported research techniques for research on wireless sensor networks, the tutorial provides the opportunity to get a feeling of whether experimentally-supported research may be of use to them. Participants that are familiar with running sensor networking experiments may learn which techniques can be of use to optimize their own wireless test set-ups. After attending the tutorial, all participants will be able to run (at least) basic experiments on the w-iLab.t, and will know where to get the right information to continue experimenting afterwards.

As an added bonus, after following this tutorial, the participants will be able to run and schedule wireless sensor networks experiments using OMF, an experiment control framework that looks to become the de-facto standard for experiment control in wireless testbeds.

Tutorial description

From the success of the FIRE (Future Internet Research and Experimentation) program funded by the European Commission, and by scanning today's literature on wireless sensor research, it is clear that experimentally supported research is an interesting research strategy to complement or validate research results based on theoretical models, simulations or emulations.
The iMinds iLab.t technology centre (http://ilabt.iminds.be) is a research infrastructure offering hardware, software tools, measurement equipment and support services to researchers and developers in academia and industry in order to help them with building and evaluating their ICT solutions. For researchers in the field of wireless networks and applications specifically, iLab.t offers generic wireless testbeds at two locations. These testbeds are known under the name of w-iLab.t and allow experimenters and developers to run wireless experiments involving one or multiple heterogeneous wireless technologies. The goal of this tutorial is to provide participants with a hands-on introduction on how to run experiments and collect results from the w-iLab.t. Considering the nature of the EWSN conference, the focus will be on running wireless sensor node experiments.

Two wireless test locations are part of the iLab.t technology centre: w-iLab.t Office and w-iLab.t Zwijnaarde. The w-iLab.t Office testbed is located over three floors of an office building in Ghent, Belgium. At approximately 200 locations spread over three floors of an office building, testbed hardware is mounted to the ceiling: at each spot, an embedded PC equipped with 2 Wi-Fi a/b/g interfaces can be found. The embedded PC further serves as a proxy device to control (configure, emulate inputs and read info from) at least one 802.15.4 sensor node (Tmote Sky). The newest deployment, w-iLab.t Zwijnaarde (a town close to Ghent) has a similar architecture; 60 fixed embedded PCs and an increasing number of mobile embedded PCs mounted on top of vacuum cleaning robots are again equipped with 2 Wi-Fi interfaces (a/b/g/n), 802.15.4 sensornodes and also Bluetooth 3.0 dongles. Furthermore, w-iLab.t Zwijnaarde hosts servers which act as proxy devices to control advanced sensing and software defined radio hardware.

The control software of the w-iLab.t office is based on the Motelab software. Over the years, it was significantly extended to improve the functionality and usability. The Zwijnaarde deployment builds on the OMF control and management framework (see also http://omf.mytestbed.net), an experiment control framework that is used in multiple wireless testbeds worldwide. From the point of view of the experimenter, both w-iLab.t deployments can be used in a similar way: an experimenter may fully control the software running on the sensor nodes and/or embedded PCs, and is free to use any combination of the available wireless interfaces and devices.

Besides provisioning the testbed with custom firmware and software, the w-iLab.t offers all tools needed to run and control experiments, as well as to collect, process and visualize data. To date, over 22000 experiment runs have been executed on w-iLab.t office, and over 1100 timeslots have been reserved in w-iLab.t Zwijnaarde. The w-iLab.t testbeds are used and further developed as part of several national and international projects, including the FP7-CREW, FP7-Openlab, FP7-Fed4Fire projects.

Program

  • Introduction to experimental evaluation and the w-iLab.t testbed (Stefan Bouckaert, 30min.) Essential basics on experimenting and on the w-iLab.t
  • Hands-on 1: running experiments on w-iLab.t office (Bart Jooris, 1h) Hands-on session, where participants will configure and run an experiment, and collect and visualize the results.
  • Hands-on 2: running OMF experiments on w-iLab.t Zwijnaarde (Vincent Sercu, 1h40) Introduction to OMF and hands-on on how to run experiments in w-iLab.t Zwijnaarde. Demonstration of an experiment with mobile robots.
  • Closing remarks: collaboration opportunities, accounts, policies, ... (Stefan Bouckaert, 20min.) Who can use the w-iLab.t? Where to get help? Possibilities to cooperate with iMinds (w-)iLab.t.

User requirements

For the hands-on sessions, participants need a laptop (any browser with Java should do, SSH client may be useful).

Biographies

Stefan Bouckaert received his MSc and PhD degrees in electro-technical engineering from Ghent University, Belgium, in 2005 and 2010 respectively. During his years as a postdoc at iMinds-IBCN, the largest part of his time was committed to the general and technical coordination the FP7-CREW project, which aims to set up an open experimentation environment for cognitive radio and cognitive networking. He is currently responsible for the business development of the iMinds iLab.t experimentation facility.

Vincent Sercu graduated in 2011 as a software engineer, and has been working with iMinds-IBCN since. Besides being co-responsible for the smooth running of the iMinds iLab.t wireless experimentation facility, he's also developping new tools and extentions. This whilst being active in various European FP7 projects such as Openlab, CREW, and recently also Fed4FIRE.

From September 2002 until March 2004, Bart Jooris designed hardware, firmware and device drivers for the retail sector at NV Real Software (now Centric Belgium). He joined iMinds/IBCN at 2004. Between March 2004 and January 2007 he worked on European and national projects with the focus on "Internet on the Train". Since 2007 he is responsible for the wireless segment of the iMinds Technical Test centre (iLab.t) in Gent, Belgium.

 


 

Tutorial 2: Building Reconfigurable Sensing Applications

Relevance of the tutorial for EWSN attendees

This tutorial tackles two important and growing problems that WSN developers face today: (1) integrating heterogeneous sensing platforms and (2) managing and reconfiguring deployed WSNs.

Tutorial description

In this tutorial, we survey the state of the art in sensor network programming, focusing on support for reconfiguration and the integration of heterogeneous devices. We then introduce the Loosely-coupled Component Infrastructure (LooCI), which provides a platform independent, reconfigurable component model and event-based binding model. The tutorial concludes with a hands-on programming exercise, wherein participants use LooCI to develop and manage a sensing application running on Contiki motes and Android smart phones.

Program

At the end of this tutorial, participants will:

  • Have an overview of the state-of-the-art in WSN programming.
  • Have in-depth knowledge of the platform independent LooCI model.
  • Be capable of using LooCI to build sensing applications that incorporate motes and smart phones.
  • Be capable of performing management and reconfiguration of deployed LooCI applications.

User requirements

Participants should have basic programming knowledge (preferably in C or Java). No previous knowledge of LooCI or the tutorial hardware platforms is necessary. All participants should bring their own laptop. The tutorial exercises will be delivered from a VirtualBox VM image.

Biographies

Prof. Danny Hughes delivers this tutorial, with support from the WSN-team of KU Leuven. Danny is an Assistant Professor at iMinds-DistriNet, KU Leuven. His interests include WSNs, participatory sensing, middleware and reconfigurable component models. He is the lead designer of LooCI and previously designed and implemented the GridStix environmental sensing platform. Prior to his appointment at KU Leuven, Danny worked at Lancaster University (UK), the University of California at Berkeley (USA) and XJTLU (China). Danny holds a PhD in Computer Science from Lancaster University and has published more than 80 academic papers in the area of Wireless Sensor Networks and Distributed Systems.